Monday, May 9, 2011

Not paying what a thing costs

Don't you love a sale?  I mean really.  Don't you love:
  • A going out of business sale where you have an opportunity to buy something at a fraction of the price that it was being offered for just last week?  It may not be for sale for less than it cost the store but it is for sale at an unbelievably low price.
  • Last year's model of a product that is available for a fraction of what this year's model would cost?  The product may not have this years cool color or this years newly redesigned enhanced and improved feature but, the product still meets your need.  It may not be for sale for less than it cost the store but it is for sale at an unbelievably low price.
  • A bidding site?  Well maybe not the new pay to bid sites where there are enough loosing bidders to pay the site owner the full cost of the product but, instead those ebay type sites where you can find things for a great price.  It may not be for sale for less than it cost the seller but it is for sale at an unbelievably low price.


In business we all love a sale.  

Some say that a company provides business value when they sell their service to you cheaper than you can provide the service for yourself.  You have to love that sale, paying less for something then that thing is worth.  It may not be for sale for less than it cost the seller but it is for sale (at an unbelievably low price) for less than you could produce it internally.

The Cloud provides value by delivering (selling) applications to you cheaper than you are able to deliver them internally.  This is especially true if you are delivering those applications responsibly.  If I were to deliver an application responsibly I would:
  • … protect user data.  I would have back-ups of my user data probably in multiple locations
  • … secure user data.  I would have policies and procedures that defined who could access that data.  I would have facilities that would assist me in implementing physical restrictions to data.  I would obfuscate data when it was at rest providing some level of on disk encryption to further impede access to the data
  • … plan for application availability.  I would have a method to ensure that the application could dynamically move from machine to machine so that no machine outage would interrupt application access.  I would have redundant power and network connections so that no infrastructure outage would interrupt application access.  I would have machines in multiple locations so that no location specific outage would interrupt application access.
  • … plan for application performance.  I would ensure that enhancements made to my application did not add an additional latency delay (didn’t increase the users response time).  I would run on an operating system and on a database that was dynamically reactive to increased user load and made more memory, more data records, and more disk space available to react to those increased user loads.
  • … plan for the best user experience.  I would ensure that my application delivered feature enhancements to my users on a regular basis.  I would perform any maintenance updates without user involvement.  



With Google you get all of the above components of responsible computing for less than you will be able to provide them internally

Better Email Uptime via the Cloud than on-premise Email Systems Provide





Dramatically Lower Email Costs


Take a look at Google Apps or some of the other Google Cloud Solutions.  Join MMY for one of our Google Seminars, attend a Google Apps Seminar, or visit our web site’s contact page to ask for other follow-up activities, contact MMY Consulting.

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